LINGUIST List 5.301

Wed 16 Mar 1994

Disc: Mosaic

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  • Richard Wojcik, Re: Mosaic
  • Natalie Maynor, Re: Mosaic
  • Philip Resnik - Sun Microsystems Labs BOpresnikcaesar.east.sun.com, Re: Mosaic

    Message 1: Re: Mosaic

    Date: Sun, 13 Mar 94 18:52:56 PSRe: Mosaic
    From: Richard Wojcik <rwojcikgrace.rt.cs.boeing.com>
    Subject: Re: Mosaic


    Margaret Fleck wrote: > Mike Hammond suggested that various groups post their interests on the > list. Groups with internet access and graphics terminals should also > be aware of a new system called Mosaic (sometimes also "Web of the > World"). This system allows local information (anything from campus > maps to lists of faculty to the full text of recent technical reports) > to be posted on the internet easily. The format includes not only > formatted text, but also graphics and even sound tracks.

    And video. And Mosaic can be used on a Unix platform running X (XMosaic), a PC running Windows (WinMosaic), or a Macintosh (MacMosaic). (Not all of these programs run the same, and they can't be run on just any PC or Macintosh. You need a SLIP/IPP account and special software.) Mosaic is quite distinct from the World Wide Web, which is based on a special SGML superset known as HTML. You usually need to "mark up" text in HTML to display it in the Web. Mosaic is perhaps the best know browser for the Web, but it is not the only one. Anyone who wants to access the Web can just telnet to 'info.cern.ch', which has an ASCII "line browser". HTML (HyperText Markup Language) allows you to create links to other files and directories anywhere on Internet. Basically, it allows you to use a special client "browser" (e.g. Mosaic) to telnet and ftp around the net without needing to know the internal IP addresses.

    > This system is distributed free (it was developed by an academic site > in Europe) and is easy to use, so it has been spreading very fast in...

    The HTML protocol was developed by CERN, but Mosaic was developed here in the US by NCSA.

    > At the moment, only some of this list may be able to use Mosaic. For > example, I don't think most of the linguists at my site have good > enough internet access. However, it looks like it may replace many of > the current network information servers as linguists (and scientists > in other fields) get access to better computing facilities.

    If you can forego the sound and graphics, you may wish to use a browser that is compatible with vt100 screens: Lynx. I use Lynx from my home account (rickweskimo.com), and it suits my needs perfectly. Lynx is also freeware. Since I can't use Mosaic with my ancient PC at home, I need Lynx for after hours browsing of the Web. Margaret Fleck is right to recommend this technology. There are vase amounts of information on languages and linguistics accessible through the Web. Not to mention everything else in the world.

    Message 2: Re: Mosaic

    Date: Mon, 14 Mar 1994 07:54:18 Re: Mosaic
    From: Natalie Maynor <maynorRa.MsState.Edu>
    Subject: Re: Mosaic


    > This system is distributed free (it was developed by an academic site > in Europe) and is easy to use, so it has been spreading very fast in > the computer science community.

    I think you may be getting Mosaic mixed up with World-Wide Web (which is easy to do since they go together). WWW was developed at CERN in Europe for use by physicists. Mosaic is a WWW browser client in hypermedia form that was developed by NCSA at the University of Illinois.

    > At the moment, only some of this list may be able to use Mosaic. For > example, I don't think most of the linguists at my site have good > enough internet access.

    People who aren't able to use Mosaic can use lynx, a terminal-based interface to WWW that won't give you the pictures and sounds but will give you the text. --Natalie (maynorra.msstate.edu)

    Message 3: Re: Mosaic

    Date: Mon, 14 Mar 1994 10:06:06 Re: Mosaic
    From: Philip Resnik - Sun Microsystems Labs BOpresnikcaesar.east.sun.com <presnikcaesar.east.sun.com>
    Subject: Re: Mosaic


    Margaret Fleck wrote: > Mike Hammond suggested that various groups post their interests on the > list. Groups with internet access and graphics terminals should also > be aware of a new system called Mosaic (sometimes also "Web of the > World").

    Just an addendum for those who do not have access to graphics terminals. Mosaic is only one tool for access to the "World Wide Web" (WWW), a rapidly growing population of Internet resources connected to each other via hypertext links. NCSA Mosaic (developed by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, NCSA) happens to be the nicest of the tools, but you can get at the vast majority of the same information (almost all WWW information is still text, after all!) using other lower-tech interfaces. It should be possible for just about anyone with Internet access to gain access to WWW using one of the following tools:

    Lynx, developed at the University of Kansas, provides a reasonable interface to the Web requiring nothing more than a vt100 terminal (no fancy video or audio capabilities) --- it is available by anonymous ftp to ftp2.cc.ukans.edu in the pub/lynx directory.

    NCSA Mosaic for the Macintosh. Requires System 7 or later, MacTCP 2.0.2 or later, 4M or more, hard disk. Available by anonymous ftp to ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu.

    NCSA Mosaic for Microsoft Windows. Requires MS Windows 3.1 in enhanced mode; minimum configuration is an 80386-SX-based machine with 4M RAM (486 with 33MHz or faster, 8M RAM recommended). Available by anonymous ftp to ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu.

    NCSA Mosaic for the X Window System. Available by anonymous ftp to ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu.

    I can't say strongly enough how important a tool the World Wide Web is going to be, and very soon. Anyone with Internet access should explore it at least a little bit to get a feeling for the power there. In just a short time I've used WWW for a host of research-related purposes such as access to library catalogues, tech reports, and bibliographies, news from academia, etc. ad infinitum, as well as a whole bunch of other interesting purposes, such as locating on-line tax forms and info, viewing Olympics results (not to mention viewing photographs of events on-line), and, yes, ordering Valentine's Day flowers from the comfort of my workstation!

    In short, although many linguistics departments may not be able to use Mosaic in all its glory, there's a great deal available even for people without the fanciest technology.

    Cheers,

    Philip <philip.resnikeast.sun.com>

    P.S. This message expresses my personal views, and not the position, official or otherwise, of Sun Microsystems. Incidentally, though, Sun's WWW server is accessible on the Web as http://www.sun.com/ and is a resource for information not only about Sun, but also about the Winter Olympics and the 1994 World Cup.